Remodeling and Home Design

Modern. Sustainable. Atlanta. 404.303.7280

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      2012
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    25 Places to Donate Your Stuff

    I think we can all agree that we probably have too much of something or items that serve no real purpose in our homes, whether it’s clothes, DVDs we never watch, unused kitchen gear, the list goes on. National charity organizations like Goodwill and the Salvation Army are always great places to donate, but while looking for more specific ways to donate some children’s toys I came across multiple websites for children’s hospitals that are collecting gently used books and toys for their waiting rooms and activity centers.

    This got me thinking that there are likely lots of ways to donate items to fill a direct need. I find it incredibly motivating to think of de-cluttering in this way; if someone else can put my stuff to better use, that’s exciting.

    • August

      25

      2012
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    Will Micro Apartments Go Macro?

    Construction has begun on an infill project at 38 Harriet Street in San Francisco that its developer, builder, and module supplier believe could determine whether micro apartments remain a highly publicized curiosity or are seen as legitimate housing alternatives for young urban professionals seeking cheaper, greener, and walkable living spaces.

    “There are a lot of eyes on this project, a lot of interest,” says Naomi Porat, president and co-founder of Zeta Communities, whose factory in Sacramento, Calif., is close to completing the 12- by 65-foot modules that will be used to construct an 11,775-square-foot four-story wood-framed building squeezed onto a 3,750-square-foot lot in this city’s South of Market Street (SoMa) district. That building will contain 23 micro apartments measuring around 300 square feet each, with nine-foot ceilings, kitchens and baths, washers and dryers, and multipurpose built-ins for storage and workspaces that can convert to sleeping areas.

    • August

      25

      2012
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    Atlanta considers new storm water rules as part of rainwater harvesting program

    A renewed push is underway in Atlanta to harvest rainwater and improve the management of storm water in an era of sustained drought.

    Rainwater harvesting is one proposed response to the need for better management of water resources. Credit: Southeast Rainwater Harvesting Systems Association

    Advocates say a regional rainwater harvesting program could produce more than 20 million gallons of water a day. That represents about 16 percent of metro Atlanta’s net consumptive use of about 125 million gallons a day, according to the latest figures maintained by the Atlanta Regional Commission.

    Two efforts are ramping up to improve the management of the region’s water resources: The drafting of potential new storm water regulations in Atlanta that would apply to all new homes, and to certain additions to existing homes and commercial properties; And, a renewed push throughout the region to encourage property owners to harvest rainwater.

    • August

      25

      2012
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    Report: Energy retrofits surpass new green buildings in benefits

    Brand new green buildings are always white hot.

    But experts have long been touting the environmental benefit of green buildings’ slightly less sexy cousin: Retrofitting existing buildings with green upgrades.

    Now there is proof.

    A groundbreaking report released earlier this year found that it is unequivocally greener to retrofit an old building than construct a new green building, no matter how many high-tech bells and whistles are in the new construction. “The Greenest Building: Quantifying the Environmental Value of Building Reuse,” was commissioned by Preservation Green Lab, a project of the National Trust for Historic Preservation with support from The Summit Foundation and in partnership with four companies, including Skanska Group.

    • August

      25

      2012
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    The Trend in New Construction, to Extreme Green or Net Zero

    The trend in new construction and retrofits can only be described as “extreme green” or “net zero.” Venture capitalists have plowed more than $4 billion into the development of sustainably designed, energy efficient buildings. Now, they are looking at ground-breaking technologies to further develop this space, according to a report just released by Boston-based Lux Research.

    To understand investment activity in the green buildings space, Lux Research analysts have followed 332 venture transactions— amounting to $4.06 billion in 160 companies— since 2000. Of the 332 investment rounds in companies that offer technology and materials for green buildings, 152 were series A investments and 83 were series B. Start-ups from North America have attracted 77 percent—or $3.1 billion— of the green building VC invested so far.

    Last year, however, nearly 50 percent of the funding—totaling $445 million—went into 15 late-stage investments, signaling the maturation of the first wave of green building start-ups.

    Meanwhile, new opportunities are emerging in a number of leading-edge areas, including integrated design, on-site power generation, energy services and the advanced building envelope.

    • August

      25

      2012
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    dan price: my tiny house

    with a refreshing contrast to the seemingly budget-less, material extensive projects published around the internet, dan price’s
    ‘tiny house’ offers a more sobering sustainability in construction and consciousness. the concept revisits the basic principles of a site,
    finding that perfect natural balance between sun, shading, ventilation, and a water source. ‘primitive living’ is above all a process of
    discovery that requires time to intimately understand the terrain, the materials and more importantly your own personal needs.
    the project challenges the very question of human necessity with regards to our culture of ‘living.’

    the dwelling is embedded into the ground, with a larger perimeter than the actual oval form of the main living space to leave room for
    future expansion and for ease of building. thick plastic covers the floor as a water barrier and wraps over the vertically placed 2×6
    wood planks. paving stones line the inside of the partition to secure the footprint from shifting while thin strips are screwed laterally to
    the upper sections to reinforce the circular shape. 2×4 wood members are stacked along their short axes to create a type of large laminated
    beam as the roof, capable of supporting the soil that will eventually insulate the entire construct. holes are cut out of the shell to make
    a door and angled skylight, inviting light and views, with flashing elements to seal the connections and keep wood and water separate.
    from this point, each person possesses the ability to customize their new home to their individual desires as this is, after all, the basic unit of what every other project stems from.

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